Half-baked ideas.
Game Thought: For the Love of the Game

The more that I think about it, the more I feel that it’s rather difficult to apply Wark’s idea of gamespace to absolutely every concept and game. While it’s a different approach to looking at games, I’m still unsure as to whether it brings us any further in finding out what games actually mean. I agree with you in that I think that Wark is ignoring the fact that games “may evoke different reactions”. While its undeniable that all games have their roots in reality, it then requires us to have an understanding of how different people react differently to different things. And trying to figure that out only opens up yet another can of worms. 

gamethought:

I find Wark’s writing to be in stark contradiction from many of the other texts we’ve read, Huizinga specifically. Where Wark urges us to pretty much claim that “life is a game” and that the focus of games can be used as a basis for human behavior, Huizinga aimed to show how games and play are…

2 years ago
1 note
Game Thought: Dawn of the Dead
I like how you discuss expansion packs, which are by definition, extras that can be added onto the game for a specific purpose. In your opinion, given all of the changes made to the zombie expansion pack, what does it all mean? Are the zombies plot-related or were they added to let player guiltlessly attack hoards of foes? Perhaps the obsolescence of the morality gauge and the fact that you are now killing without consequence is what made the experience so different.

gamethought:

I was happy to find in this reading that the attention was turned towards the game designers very early. Treanor and Mateas point out how the game designer manipulates various elements; the rules, dynamics, themes, and aesthetics, in order to help represent a meaning. I was getting a little…

2 years ago
1 note
Game Thought: Ethical games

What I find interesting is how NHL allows players to change the rules - in fact, this idea wasn’t really explored in any of the readings. How do we look at a game where some of the rules are subject to change? If the game itself allows us to cheat, then is that really “cheating”? Or is it the player-community that looks down on this rule-breaking what determines whether it is considered cheating? 

gamethought:

One thing that is always interesting to me when discussing ethics in video games is the way the rules within the game are structured and how they are allowed to be manipulated in order to give a certain experience to the gamer. For instance, in games like Call of Duty, “camping” is allowed…

2 years ago
2 notes
Re: Game Thought: Good Will Hunting

I really like how you linked Juul’s emotional attachment towards what we might consider one of the biggest leaps from reality that videogames provide - the ability to die repeatedly. 

I’m interested in whether the game itself encouraged you to feel bad when you died or whether this aversion is purely due to your respect towards Clint Eastwood-esque characters. I feel that some games like Super Mario make death in-game seem almost comical or trivial, while dying in Team Fortress 2 is often a humiliating experience. In other words, was your reaction towards dying in RDD purely from internal factors, or did the game itself set the mood for you?

gamethought:

Juul’s supplies us with a new and concrete (even proven) outline of what makes something a game. I found his biggest variation from Huizinga’s ‘play’ was the various stress and restrictions as to what the outcome is: more specifically, that there must be some emotional attachment to the…

2 years ago
4 notes
Game Thought: A History of Violence

While this doesn’t have much to do with the readings, your post made me wonder why a game would include a karma meter if there were no narrative consequences. It sounds as if DRR is trying to avoid patronizing the player - by altering their experience in retaliation for doing something the game deems immoral… If the karma meter were to become diegetic (or somehow plot significant) how do you think your playing experience would change? 

gamethought:

Galloway is the first we’ve had who has broken down the construct of the video game into such practical and mechanical terms. Turning the player into the “operator” and highlighting the algorithmic nature of computers he shows how games, by default, are something finite. He does not place player…

2 years ago
1 note
Game Thought: Trauma: Paper Outline

Sounds interesting. What I’m curious about (though this may only be because we haven’t seen your game in-class yet) is how the game forces the player to become a “different player”. Does this mean that their repertoire is changed? Also, if the game never give the player any rules, is the relationship between the game and the player purely up to the player to decide? 

gamethought:

As of now, my thesis is as followed: “The relationship between the game and its players is possibly Trauma’s most enriching form through representing its fiction and desired experience.”

The readings I plan to incorporate into my paper include “Hills and Lines FFXIII” by Simon Ferrari,…

2 years ago
1 note
Game Thought: The Artist

I agree that a games storyline is crucial to the overall experience, but it wasn’t always that way. I feel that improvements to hardware and graphics have made it much easier to make videogames a form of art. Gameworlds can get bigger, more details can be included, plots more intricate, etc. The sheer scale of these gameworlds makes me feel obligated to the creators to explore everything! While the fictional aspect of videogames is still strictly optional, we have come a long way, to a point where ignoring the story is missing out on a large portion of the game.

gamethought:

Everyone plays a game their own way, we talked about this in class yesterday that there are different kinds of gamers. After today’s reading you can extend that to say that different players will experience the game in different ways, will interact with the fictional world of the game in…

2 years ago
4 notes